WHY IS FLOSSING IMPORTANT?

Flossing removes food and bacteria from in between your teeth and below your gumline. When you floss, you prevent bad breath, tooth decay, gum disease, and the loss of your teeth.

#1

Gum disease is the number one reason for tooth loss 1

10

Most adults have lost 10 teeth by the age of 65 1

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“Gum infections cause body-wide inflammation that raises the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes, both of which in turn increase the risk of acquiring a life-threatening coronavirus infection. In fact, inflammation alone is a risk factor for developing Covid-19.”

-Jane Brody

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Gumline

BRUSHING YOUR TEETH IS NOT ENOUGH

Everybody brushes their teeth but oral disease is still incredibly common. The problem is we don’t floss enough which leaves decomposing food and disease causing microbes in the crevices of our teeth and gums.

98%

of people brush once a day or more 2

30%

of people floss once a day or more 2

Gum Disease Level 1 Gum Disease Level 2 Gum Disease Level 3

NOT FLOSSING LEADS TO CAVITIES AND GUM DISEASE

While most microbes are essential for health, some bacteria can produce acid that destroys enamel (tooth decay). Other bacteria can cause inflammation that destroys tissue and bone (gum disease).

91%

of adults have tooth decay 3

47%

of adults have severe gum disease 4

Gum Diseases

GUM DISEASE PREVENTION LOWERS YOUR RISK FOR OTHER DISEASES

Oral bacteria spread from the mouth to other parts of the body and are a significant source of low-grade, chronic inflammation5. When you prevent gum disease you can reduce your dental expenses6 and your risk for chronic diseases5 and Covid-1912.

42%

lower use of major and basic dental services 6

45%

improved diabetes control 6

Product

FRESH IS THE EASY WAY TO CLEAN BETWEEN YOUR TEETH

People don’t floss because it takes too long, it can be painful, and it’s often not a pleasant experience. Fresh makes it easy to form a flossing habit by providing a minty, tingly deep-cleaning in just 7 seconds.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2004
  2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2016
  3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012
  4. Winning, L., Linden, G. Periodontitis and systemic disease. BDJ Team 2, 15163 (2015).
  5. Aetna Dental/Medical Integration Program Data 2017
  6. Müller F. Oral hygiene reduces the mortality from aspiration pneumonia in frail elders. J Dent Res. 2015;94(3 Suppl):14S–16S.
  7. Dhadse P, Gattani D, Mishra R. The link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease: How far we have come in last two decades?. J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2010;14(3):148–154.
  8. Preshaw PM, Alba AL, Herrera D, et al. Periodontitis and diabetes: a two-way relationship. Diabetologia. 2012;55(1):21–31.
  9. Lertpimonchai A, Rattanasiri S, Tamsailom S, et al. Periodontitis as the risk factor of chronic kidney disease: Mediation analysis. J Clin Periodontol. 2019;46(6):631–639.
  10. Dominique S. Michaud, Kaumudi Joshipura, Edward Giovannucci, Charles S. Fuchs, A Prospective Study of Periodontal Disease and Pancreatic Cancer in US Male Health Professionals, JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Volume 99, Issue 2, 17 January 2007, Pages 171–175.
  11. Cerajewska, T., Davies, M. & West, N. Periodontitis: a potential risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Br Dent J 218, 29–34 (2015).
  12. Sampson, V. Oral hygiene risk factor. Br Dent J 228, 569 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41415-020-1545-3